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Topic: The Snareman Chronicles

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Forum Home > General Discussion > The Snareman Chronicles

LT GREY
Member
Posts: 16

 This is a post that I had on another trapping forum, but unfortunately did not last very long before it got axed, which by the way, defeated the purpose.

That purpose being, teaching  and sharing with others about  how one goes about snaring fur bearers on a large scale. Everything from  choosing the right cable, making your own snares, treatment of snares, different types of snares for different uses and proper snaring techniques.

I don't claim to know everything. I do however offer 32 years of snaring experience in a number of  states and in a diversity of ecosystems, weather conditions and terrains,

My techniques that I use today, will still vary from what someone else uses to accomplish the same results...and that's ok.

I will add some photos that will hopefully take the guess work out of how I do things. As  earlier stated, my way is just one of many that work, not the only way. I still learn new things each and every season.

Viewers, both novice and professional can all add something that will help  many others and shorten the learning curve for many who are new or have limited experience with snaring.

I hope many will add to this and help make it a positive forum for those that want to share and learn.

March 13, 2011 at 12:23 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

1poortrapper
Member
Posts: 122

LT I really enjoy your post. Any shortening on the learning curve you could do for me would be helpful. 

--

If you always do what you've always done then you will always get what you've always got.

March 13, 2011 at 12:41 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

LT GREY
Member
Posts: 16

One of the first things I feel trappers should be aware of, is the quality (or l I should say, lack or quality) of cable out there available to trappers. Rally Hess, to his credit, wrote a brilliant piece on Trapperman. Com on this very subject.  I have never used any of Rally's products, but know trappers who have and speak very highly of it. I have used Gregerson's, O'Gorman's, both of Montana and Newt Sterling's products. All of which I recommend. It would be rare that I would use cable that didn't come from 1 of those 3 sourses, at least at this time.

March 13, 2011 at 3:00 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

The Trapster
Member
Posts: 15

Im in Lt..Ill share what I can ,look forward to the posts.

March 13, 2011 at 4:46 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

Uncle Stinky
Member
Posts: 387

I'm all ears LT. I'm not a snare man by no means as we have a very limited time of year that we can use them, but with the snowfall the last couple of years it would be a very useful tool.

 

We have to use relaxing locks here and cannot use them within 3' of fences or near any vegation which has a diameter of a 1/2" or more. I have seen how you load a snare vid you did. Very nice.

--

Future Beneficiary of the JLord Set!

March 13, 2011 at 7:43 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

Uncle Stinky
Member
Posts: 387

Oh and I promise not smart remarks from on this post boys!

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Future Beneficiary of the JLord Set!

March 13, 2011 at 7:44 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

J-M
Member
Posts: 46

I only have 3 questions: LOL ya there will be more

 

 

What type of lock is the best and is a kill spring needed?

 

 

What type of stands dose everyone like is (material and overall design)?

 

What material do you like to use and why?

 

Thanks Lt.Grey for making the video on loading a mink snare maybe that could be linked here. That video made me realize the importance of loading a snare and how easily it can be done.

March 15, 2011 at 12:34 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

Uncle Stinky
Member
Posts: 387

I sure hope LT isn't caught in one of his snares! He goes and gets us all riled up!

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Future Beneficiary of the JLord Set!

March 15, 2011 at 2:03 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

James Lord
Site Owner
Posts: 451
thanks for taking the time to post this LT. i appreciate and i am sure others do too. i can see on a big forum like tman or others how it is easier to just axe the whole thread....but here so far just changing a few words is all i have had to do.
--
James

Trappers Lodge Housekeeper

March 18, 2011 at 9:02 AMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

LT GREY
Member
Posts: 16

Types of locks and is a kill spring needed ?

Good questions.

I suppose I am like many who have seen Marty Senneker's  DVD  where he uses choke/compression springs to successfully snare and kill coyotes with almost 100% kill results in just a matter of minutes after capture.    Impressive results to say the least. However choke springs on snares are illegal in many places here in the lower 48. In fact, I can only think of two states right off, those being Montana and North Dakota. Might be a few more that I'm not aware of...but it isn't many!

So, how does one go about successfully snaring coyotes and other predators with a zero,(or close to it) loss without choke/compression springs ?

One of the reasons I have been more successful snaring coyotes and keeping my losses to a minimum is by choosing a better lock and better quality cable to start with. My personal choice is 1x19-5/64th stainless Korean, with 1x19-5/64th galvanized  Korean being my 2nd choice. The galvanized is about 1/2 the cost of stainless, so there's a plus. The Korean is a much better  quality cable than Chinese and, as much as I hate to say it, anything American made. Facts are facts !

The  1x19-5/64th is my best all around choice for coyotes, 'coons and beaver, although, I have killed a lot of them in the 1x19-1/16th size. I also lost 5 coyotes this year alone on 1/16th. I'm almost ashamed to admit that, but it happened. I have killed enough coyotes and beaver to know it works well in the RIGHT CONDITIONS where you have SUBSTANTUAL VERTICAL ENTANGLEMENT...but that isn't everywhere.  Another reason I am a strong user and supporter of kill poles. Not everyone shares my views and I am aware of that. They do have their place. Longer extension cable is another trick, but let's say you are in a state where you are forced to use a "cable restraint" with a deer stop, thick cable relaxing lock and no entanglement...then what ?

My locks of choice would have to be the Slim lock, Gregerson's L-4 , both because of low visibility and the TRUE Camloc made in Canada. I say TRUE CAMLOC because there are a bunch of knock-offs that are cheap imitations and not nearly as effective as the original. They are sold by many trap supply companies marketed merely as a "cam lock". They may look the same to an untrained eye but they are not nearly the quality as the Canadian made originals.

Many have also gone to filing teeth into the Camloc, to assure a tighter grip and as to not have any slippage or back outs.  Not something I've used here.

The Camloc with a B.A.D., such as the one made by Hal Sullivan will also close tighter than if used without one.

March 20, 2011 at 2:52 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

Ohio Andy
Moderator
Posts: 115

LT, we have talked before and you really opened my eyes to snaring.   In my mind, a trapper who grew up trapping with have a learning curve to get into snaring and be good at it.  It takes a different approach.  The trapper need to train himself to look for the right snare locations.

I am guilty of using the snare as a fall back.  I always have snares with me when trapping, but i reach for them after the foot traps.  This year, i found myself reaching for them more often and depending on conditions, sometimes first. 

I am not saying i am a good sanremean, in fact, i am not even close to it.  But i am working on it and reaching for the snare more often.

 

I bought some 5/64 1x19 from Newt this year in PA and i must saying, i agree with LT.  That is some nice cable.

 

In my area it seems that all the coyote travel the same paths as the deer.  What do you do to avoid incidental deer catches?

You are a great addition to the Forum LT and the sport as a whole.

--

Andy

 

March 24, 2011 at 7:27 AMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

J-M
Member
Posts: 46

 Once our snow piles up our coyotes mostly follow deer trails. This winter I walked my trap line in snow snowshoes and I could get deer to follow my path but rarely found a coyote track in my trail unless I was in the deer yarding area. The only thing I can think of is starting to put out bait stations for the coyotes then connecting them to the deer yarding area with my snowshoe trail.   I saw a video on Wolfer Nation where Clint said that Lt Grey used an "h" type kill pole do you still find these to be superior to a rod with washer in agricultural land soil un-frozen and frozen or for setting & carrying purposes (the h stands look like they might tangle pretty bad) or is it easier to just weld a large washer on the kill pole and how heavy of a pole dose one need if the kill pole were 4 feet out of the ground(1/2")? I am hoping to have all my kill poles set prior to the ground freezing.

March 24, 2011 at 3:37 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

LT GREY
Member
Posts: 16

Thanks Ohio Andy, I had a post on T-Man, called Snaring Go-Unders and part of it was not only snaring fence go-unders but also using slanted limbs and brush to avoid deer and successfully snare coyotes and foxes with ease.  You're right...they do indeed travel the same trails...all animals do. But to keep deer out of your sets, it only takes some forethought and some slight construction with NATIVE plants and limbs to do the job. This past season, I had one accidental deer catch, which resulted in a quick release, due to a Sullivan BAD and a pile of coyotes. I will try to add some pics on here for those of you who haven't read my post on other forums.

BTW- You can over block and cause coyotes to avoid your trail sets...

March 27, 2011 at 3:15 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

Uncle Stinky
Member
Posts: 387

What about relaxing locks, LT? That's what we're required to use here.

--

Future Beneficiary of the JLord Set!

March 29, 2011 at 9:35 AMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

LT GREY
Member
Posts: 16

Great question Uncle Stinky, and I may add, a controversial one...

It seems that what one Game Dept. calls a relaxing lock, another does not. And it also seems that it can vary from one WO to the next. That in itself can often be confusing and even downright scary, when all is considered.

I would ask the state head and my local WO what he considers a "relaxing lock."  Often times it seems to be a "grey" area, with no clear guide lines. Other times in other states, it is very clear. It would be interesting to know just what locks you guys use where you live.

 

many states also allow a lock that will break away. The Gregerson L4 is one I often use. There are better locks, mind you...but I do catch a good many coyotes with them.

April 9, 2011 at 12:05 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

Uncle Stinky
Member
Posts: 387

LT, I will try to get a pic of one and post it. Just a bent washer and while their WI legal they sure don't seem to relax to much.

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Future Beneficiary of the JLord Set!

April 11, 2011 at 7:56 AMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

1poortrapper
Member
Posts: 122

We don't have to use relaxing locks but I got a few from Kyle Kaatz. I like them and they do relax like they are meant to but I find with the big lock they are hard to get to hang in the position you want. Any tips for hanging these or maybe a different relaxing lock.

--

If you always do what you've always done then you will always get what you've always got.

April 11, 2011 at 12:43 PMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

J-M
Member
Posts: 46

Well I believe you have me sold on the 1X19 5/64" galvanized cable I knda like the cam locks noticed some in O’Gorman’s catalogue that were not galvanized and I was thinking of dipping white Also there was a file to put teeth on the lock dose this really help? I think I like the Idea of breakaway devices better than deer stops because of working around live stock but I have no idea what weight ones would be correct. I do know that it does matter what length your snare is I plan on using 5 footers on a kill pole

April 12, 2011 at 10:33 AMEdit Delete Flag Quote & Reply

 

 

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